Monday, 5 September 2016

Magnetic bracelets offer inexpensive relief to osteoarthritis sufferers

A beautiful magnetic bangle from Magnetic Products Store
The trouble with living in Britain is that you can have all our seasons in one day!

This is fine if you are indoors, looking out of the window. But if you are out and about, it can be a problem - especially if you suffer from arthritis. Chronic arthritis, and osteoarthritis in particular, is enough of a problem at the best of times. But bad weather makes it worse.

I have to add a caveat here that not everyone in the medical community accepts this opinion. An article in the Mail Online a few years ago quoted one Professor Philip Conaghan, professor of musculoskeletal medicine at the University of Leeds to the effect that:
Scientific trials have failed to prove this. There is no evidence to show weather or climate has any effect on arthritis. OA occurs all over the world, in all types of climates.'
Men's magnetic bracelet
However, the issue is surely not whether or not osteoarthritis occurs in all types of climate, but whether it occurs with the same incidence in all climates. And this question, the Mail online article does not address. In contrast, however, an article on the Arthritis Foundation tells us that:
Changes in temperature or barometric pressure, a measure that refers to the weight of the surrounding air, trigger joint pain, though researchers aren’t entirely sure why. In 2007, researchers at Tufts University in Boston reported that every 10-degree drop in temperature corresponded with an incremental increase in arthritis pain. Increasing barometric pressure was also a pain trigger in the Tufts study.
The article goes on to say:
In fact, studies in cadavers have found that barometric pressure affects pressure inside the joints. In one experiment, when pressure in the hip joints was equated with atmospheric pressure, it threw the ball of the hip joint about one-third of an inch off track.
Magnetic elbow wrap
This would appear to suggest that the weather effect is real. But the question is what can be done about it? Magnetic therapy has been the subject of ongoing controversy. But the one area where conventional medicine appears to be grudgingly ready to acknowledge that it works, is in providing pain relief for sufferers of osteoarthritis.

Indeed, a Randomised controlled trial of magnetic bracelets for relieving pain in osteoarthritis of the hip and knee, published by the British Medical Journal, states that:
We found evidence of a beneficial effect of magnetic wrist bracelets on the pain of osteoarthritis of the hip and knee. Self reported unblinding to treatment group did not substantially affect the results.
Sports wfristband
The study is extremely detailed and thorough, taking into account "blinding removal" - testing if the magnets are real or not. It clearly rules out the placebo effect. Of particular interest is that it goes on to say that the treatment works better with stronger magnets. Finally, the article notes that magnetic bracelets are cost-effective because they can be used in conjunction with other treatments and because the bracelets are a one-off purchase:
the effects seem additive to those of the participants' usual treatment. The (one off) cost of bracelets (around £30-£50 ($58-$96, €43-€92)), compares well with that of analgesics (paracetamol £20 a year, newer non-steroidal anti-inflammatories £250 a year).
This would seem to pretty much close the case. For someone suffering from osteoarthritis, it's a no-brainer.

Thursday, 21 July 2016

This sporting life


Well, it's now only three weeks away. That two-week spectacular when the finest sporting representatives of over 100 nations will aim to prove themselves to be Faster, Higher and Stronger than their competitors - hopefully without the use of anabolic steroids and other performance-enhancing drugs.

I am refering - of course - to the 2016 Summer Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro. One of the things I like about the Olympics is that they encourage ordinary people to take up if not sport then at least physical fitness and exercise - at least for the Olympic fortnight itself, and sometimes for the first few weeks after that. Even if many people drop out, with some it will last. And if nothing else, the sight of pot-bellied, middle-aged dad doing some exercise, might set an example for the children.

This is especially true of boys and especially young ones, who like to copy their dad. If the effect of this is to set toddlers and their slightly older siblings on a path of regular exercise and healthy living, that is surely a good thing - even if it plays havoc with your visit to the local swimming pool when some fat slob dives in displacing a large volume of water in all directions!

Of course one of the risks with people suddenly taking sport and thinking they are fitter than they are is the risk of sports injury. That is why it is good to have an online retailer like Magnetic Products Store selling a change of wraps, and high-quality sports bracelets at reasonable prices.

Of course, if mental games and intellectual competition are more your scene, then you might be interested in taking a survey on your game-playing habits, or check out this new game being developed, and it's associated page on Facebook.

Tuesday, 14 June 2016

High street blues

Those of you who follow this blog know that I am a passionate advocate of the power of magnetic bracelets. I would hardly blog about it if I wasn't. But what I've been wondering lately is why magnetic jewellery has such a low profile when it comes to the high street?

The received wisdom of the retail trade is that if a certain type of merchandise is popular online then it is also popular in the high street. This might come as a surprise to some people. But remember that there are swings and roundabouts when it comes to retail. The internet tends to offer a wider range of choice, but the high street and offer try-before-you-buy. The internet usually offers lower prices, whereas the high street (and shopping mall) offer instant gratification- you don't have to wait until it arrives by mail or courier service.

That is why we still have high street bookshops - despite Amazon - and why we have food retailers, despite Ocado and online food retail. Admittedly some things have shifted to the online world. That is why record shops are dead. They simply could not compete with downloadable music which offered massive choice as well as instant gratification.

But that is something that can be reduced to electronic form. It is axiomatic that items that can only exist in physical form will continue to have a place on the high street. To adapt Mark Twain's phrase: reports of the death of the high street are greatly exaggerated.

So why not magnetic bracelets? Why are they not there?

I think the answer lies - to some extent - in the economics of the high street, in contradistinction to the internet. Take a company like  Magnetic Products Store. They are able to sell all over the world because of the power of internet outreach as well as fulfillment by major internet retail partners. This takes financial resources, but equivalent to opening just one, or maybe two, high street retail outlets. It's no comparison. To reach out to the customer base via the high street would require a whole chain of shops and thus a massive investment.

Why would any successful online retailer do this when they can reach out to a much bigger customer base via the worldwide web?

It's a no-brainer. The status quo simply makes more sense... at least for the time-being. But that may not always be the case. After all, as the customer base increases sooner or later people are going to want to buy the top brand.

Saturday, 14 May 2016

Energy pendants

Those of you who have been following my other blogs will know that I have been singing the praises of energy pendants lately. Here's a picture of them so that you can see why! They are beautiful and each one is different from the rest. They are not so much a product range - or even a family - as a population of diverse individuals.
And there's at least one to suit everyone.
Of course we all have favourites. But we don't have to stick to just one. It might be the gold-plated butterfly one day and the ace of spaces the next.


Music lovers might go for the Lover Never Dies pendant. While those of a more fiery disposition might favour the Dual Plates Flame.
Of course, not everyone likes them. In my internet searching, I found one site that set out to "warn" people against these pendants, claiming that they are the devil's work! Don't you just love a good bit of paranoia, once in a while.



Anyway, my own view is that they are the work of skilled designers and good manufacturers or craftsmen. And I will continue to wear them if, as and when the fancy grabs me.

Thursday, 21 April 2016

Removing links on your bracelet

Resizing tool instructions
Resizing tool instructions
One of the things that distinguishes Magnetic Products Store from the crowd is that not only do they offer a huge variety of magnetic bracelets that can be purchased by people with a wide variety of chronic ailments, but they also offer excellent customer service.

For example, every links bracelet they sell, comes with a resizing tool that enables customers to remove links from their bracelet without having to send it back. This tool arrives with clear instructions on how to use it.

Expanding bracelet
Expanding bracelet
But of course the problem only arises if you buy a bracelet with links. Magnetic Products Store also sells a range of expanding bracelets. These are easy to put on and take off, because they expand over the hand. And you can slide them up your lower arm so that they sit close to the skin, thereby maximizing their effect.

For the athletes among you, suffering from sports injuries, they also some very nice silicone sports wrist bands. These too stretch over the hand and fit snugly on the wrist. With these, the issue of the bracelet being too big doesn't arise.

Copper bangle
Copper bangle - looks ancient
So already it is clear that when it comes to the "problem" of the magnetic bracelet being the wrong size, Magnetic Products Store leaves you spoilt for choice when it comes to the solution.

But that's not the end of the story, because finally - while we're on the subject of one-size-fits-all - they sell a very nice range of magnetic bangles. Like the rest of their range, these come in in a various materials: i.e. solid coppercopper alloystainless steel and titanium.

So one way or another you need never worry about your magnetic bracelet being the wrong size.

Friday, 11 March 2016

Magnetic Bracelets for sport and health

Magnetic bracelets for sport are amongst the most popular items sold by Magnetic Products Store and for a very good reason: they serve a useful purpose.

Take for example the AUGUSTA BIO Golfers Magnetic Therapy Bracelet with leather strap shown above. It has a massively powerful 6500 Gauss magnet. That's AWESOME!!!

Or how about this beautiful original IonTopia®  HI_PRIME Limited Editions magnetic bracelet with a very soft silicone strap and four magnets with a strength of 3000 gauss EACH!

Or how about this Neoprene Ankle Wrap for those who have twisted an ankle for example?


Clearly we're talking about a good range of choice here.

Wednesday, 10 February 2016

Saint Valentine's day fast approaches

Mariela Hearts
First, just a quick update: the winter giveaway is over and was a great success, with 83 entries. The winner has been informed.
Next up is St. Valentine's Day. No doubt some of you are wondering where the tradition of giving St. Valentine gifts comes from and who was this St. Valentine that we celebrate as the "patron saint of lovers."
The trouble is that there was not one but actually fourteen saints called Valentine - or Valentinius to use the Latin form! And guess how many of these were associated with romantic love? Sorry to disappoint the romantics out there, but the answer is a big fat ZERO. Not even one of them had anything to do with romance! 
So who were they? And why were they canonised? Well the answer is that like most saints - or at least the early ones - they were Christian martyrs. But which of them was the one we associate with the 14th of February? Again, sorry to disappoint, but the answer is three of them.
MPS Bio
But how did Christian martyrs come to be associated with romantic love? It's hard to say exactly, but the process was probably a gradual one. In Christian tradition, marriage is a sacrament which symbolises God's (and Jesus') love for humankind. And there were legends and myths about early Christians performing secret marriage ceremonies for low-ranking Roman soldiers who were allegedly not allowed to marry.
The problem is that this is a myth. Roman soldiers of all ranks were allowed to marry. Indeed being pagans they were allowed more than one wife. Ironically it was in England much later - in the nineteenth century - that the lowest-ranking soldiers in the army were not allowed to marry. Hence the saying: "Officers and their ladies, non-coms and their wives, privates and their women..."
The earliest written record of any association of St. Valentine's Day with romance, dates back to the high middle ages when Geoffrey Chaucer wrote a poem called the Parliament of Foules about the anniversary of the engagement of England's King Richard II to Anne of Bohemia. The poem associates the betrothal with "St. Valentine's Day, when every bird cometh there to choose his mate."
Because of Chaucer's formidable stature as the leading English writer - and because February 14 had been designated as "St. Valentine's Day" by the prevailing Roman Catholic Church - that day henceforth came to be accepted as the day that must be associated with romantic love and lovers. That view was reinforced by Shakespeare 220 years later in Hamlet.
We don't know too much about how this manifested itself in Stuart times, let alone the austere republican Commonwealth of Oliver Cromwell. Even the role of Valentine's Day in the early decades of the Hanoverian dynasty remain obscure. But by the late eighteenth century and the reign of George the Third, young men were sending handwritten cards to their paramours as a matter of course. And because this was an era of prosperity and industry, printed Valentine cards began to appear. This was soon followed by the giving of romantic presents such as flowers. Then in the nineteenth century - when those three great quaker entrepreneurs Henry Isaac Rowntree, John Cadbury and Joseph Fry set up their chocolate factories -  another item became popular as a Valentine's Day gift.


Jamain Lilcac
Today, in the great restaurant age, candle-lit dinners are popular. And for those who can afford it, jewellery is the ultimate romantic gift.
But precious jewellery is not within everyone's price range. And so the Magnetic Products Store is here to offer an alternative: magnetic jewellery. And because in this egalitarian age, women can now buy presents for men, this range includes bracelets for men, sports magnets and the best bracelets around.
And in honour of St. Valentine's Day, they are doing a major promotion.

But hurry up. Remember St. Valentine's Day is only four days away and you want to allow enough time for the item(s) you order to reach you.

Sunday, 17 January 2016

January Sale

 MPS™ ALIOTH SUPPER GS Titanium Magnetic Bracelet
MPS™ ALIOTH SUPPER GS
Titanium Magnetic Bracelet
A little message for you all about how little things can make a big difference in the realm of magnetic bracelets.

For anyone living north of the Tropic of Cancer, January is a downer on account of the cold weather and short days. December is bearable because of the Yuletide festivals. But the first month of he year offers no such comforts.

Of course, what we really need is something to brighten things up a bit. And there are two things that fit the bill. One is treating ourselves to something - anything - as long as it's new. The other is something bright... and in jewellery. And jewellery doesn't have to be expensive. Chrome steel, Swarovski are just as bright and beautiful as gold, silver, diamonds and rubies.

And the good news is that ou can kill two birds with one stone. Because the Magnetic Products Store's January Sale has started!!!!

And that means you can now buy magnetic jewellery at discounts of up to 80%.
And I can tell you one thing, when you put a bright shiny magnetic bracelet on your wrist, not only does it brighten up your day - it also brightens things up for those around you.

Thursday, 10 December 2015

Criteria for choosing magnetic bracelets

One of the problems you face as a consumer buying magnetic bracelets is that you are spoilt for choice. This applies not only to the multiplicity of eTailers selling magnetic jewellery but also to the vast range of magnetic bangles, bracelets, necklaces, etc that you find in the larger internet retail outlets - most notably Magnetic Products Store, the biggest supplier of magnetic bracelets in Europe and the second biggest in the world (by product range).

To address this problem, you need to establish some buying criteria. These may include price range, size considerations and appearance. This last is especially important because the very word jewellery derives from the French word for joy - and the source of the joy is the brightness and visual stimulation afforded by the jewellery, not the number of Newtons it exerts on a piece of iron in close proximity.

This may come as a surprise to some people, who think they should look first and foremost at functional considerations like the number of the magnets or their strength. But the fact of the matter is that there isn't a huge difference in the magnetic strength of the various bracelets and bangles - except maybe the double-strength ones, obviously. But even if there were, it would have very limited impact on their properties, except in a few cases.

The reason for this is that you wear the bracelet long-term and so it is the long-term effect that matters. Even with medicine, where you want a powerful effect to kick in quickly, you wouldn't necessarily want a high dose, if only because a high dose can sometimes be too high. Now I am not saying that you can overdose on magnets, because of course you can't, unless you happen to be carrying a five-ton super magnet on your person - in which case you'll probably give yourself a hernia and then you'll need a magnetic wrap of some kind! But I am suggesting that you shouldn't dwell too much on the magnetic strength of the bracelet.

Pay attention instead to the cry of your heart and the gleam in your eye. If it looks nice, then buy it.

Sunday, 15 November 2015

Magnetic products store versus Wikipedia

A recent post on the blog of Magnetic Products Store challenged the obvious bias of the Wikipedia article on Magnet Therapy. The post points out that attempts to add balance to the Wikipedia article were rebuffed (i.e. deleted) by the owner of the blog. Below is an extract:

It was pointed out a few months ago, in an addition to the Wikipedia entry, that one of the articles cited as evidence that magnetic therapy doesn't work, in fact contains the sentence: “For osteoarthritis, the evidence is insufficient to exclude a clinically important benefit, which creates an opportunity for further investigation.” (Emphasis added)
Unfortunately, this attempt to give balance to the Wikipedia article, was unceremoniously rebuffed. The qualifying sentence was removed from the Wikipedia entry by the person who controls the entry – even though the added sentence was only quoting from the same article that the main author of the Wikipedia entry had already cited! This too was pointed out, but the gatekeeper remained unmoved. There followed an amicable exchange in the discussion page in which the gatekeeper sought to bolster their case by citing a 2012 study on magnetic therapy in osteoarthritis.
However, if one looks carefully at the phraseology of the Wikipedia entry, it states that the articles cited found “insufficient evidence to conclude that magnet therapy is effective for pain relief.” (Emphasis added) And one of the reasons that the source articles cited for rejecting even the most stringent double-blind studies that supported the case for magnetic therapy was “difficulty with allocation concealment.” In layman's terms: the test subjects could themselves test to see whether they have a magnet or a placebo by holding it to an iron object or surface. 
Now it is certainly true that the test subjects could do this. But how many actually do or would?

The post continues to demolish the flawed, biased, one-sided Wikipedia article. Indeed even the 2012 study - which the article owner added to bolster their cases - actually stated that the magnetic therapy had not been either proven or disproven. In other words, the most one could say was that the jury was till out.
Why then did the Wikipedia article call magnetic therapy "pseudoscientific"? Why indeed?

Wednesday, 4 November 2015

The long holiday was nice but I will start post new items soon.

Saturday, 21 May 2011

About stainless steel magnetic bracelets

As it is really painless to preserve, opposed to to substances, will not oxidize, tarnish or lighten - what more could you ask for?

Stainless Steel Magnetic Therapy Bracelets from Magnetic Products Store gives numerous designs and plating such as gold and silver. The stainless steel magnetic bracelets include many magnets, up to 20 magnets spread around the wrist, and they all have catch closure. The size can vary from thick, broad extra large Stainless Steel magnetic Bracelet that appear strong and chunky to fine, and can be for ladies elegant stainless steel magnetic bracelet just like the Bayan II bracelet. Your individual significance of aesthetics will reveal which of the styles will suit you the best. In Addition to the classic links design, the Stainless Steel Magnetic Bracelets comes with acupresssure Rolling Balls design, where hematite magnetic sphere shaped magnets gives you acupuncture-like affects.

Stainless steel jewellery is one of today’s most popular jewellery frills for a number of very lovely factors. Nobody creates your personal proclamation in the function of pungently so steel. The treatment of Stainless Steel inside the makeup of magnetic bracelets aids on the road to bestow you with a outcome whose life span is lengthy plus whose outer shell will not remain discolored or flawed in excess of time.

Stainless steel is the most utilitarian concrete steel, that  is long-lasting sufficient for day-to-day furthermore long-term corrosion. Stainless steel is such a relentless steel that it is a challenge to make jewellery and hence not inexpensive as a buffed product. Also, stainless steel magnetic bracelets are hypoallergenic and do not enclose any base metal which can cause an allergic reaction. As a result a stainless steel magnetic bracelet will proper for for anyone with sensitive skin, or else anybody who desires to bear their magnetic bracelet permanently.

Reaction to Nickel is the for the most part general metal allergy and it is generally said that 18% of natives are allergic to it. Our stainless steel magnetic jewellery is 316L grade Stainless Steel, which complies with the EU Nickel Directive. Jewellery made from Stainless Steel is less likely to make happen a reaction.

When wearing a stainless steel magnetic bracelet from us, you can be sure to have a shape declaration mix with the repayment of magnetic therapy. We tend to  have available stainless steel magnetic bracelets and stainless steel bracelets that are utterly manufactured from start to finish in a process where we can control the quality of stainless steel used.

Some of the magnetic treatment bracelets in this sections are IPG plated. IPG plating applies to this magnetic bracelet, where the metal is being electroplated in a vacuum and will last longer, which means they are of exceptional attention to golf players or athletes which may engaged in far-reaching physical activities that not release nickel salts into the body or induce contact nickel rush.

More information about stainless steel can be found at Magnetic Products Store Knowledge pages.


Tuesday, 12 October 2010

New activity at magnetic products store

We now see a lot more activity at the largest on-line store for magnetic jewellery in the UK. We can see profound changes in some key and very important page. For example, the home page of the magnetic therapy store is now mimiking the category pages for magnetic bracelets and magnetic bangles.
The structure of the page is now allowing an very easy browsing for magnetic jewellery. The first part of the page display the bracelets by sub categories.

One can easilly jump to the titanium magnetic bracelets or the copper alloys magnetic bracelets. Two important segments of titanium and steel were split into yet again to two more sub categories - the Premium titanium magnetic bracelets and the Premium Stainless Steel Magnetic Bracelets.

Read more at:
http://m1p1s.wordpress.com/

Monday, 4 October 2010

Thursday, 2 September 2010

Bioflow magnetic bracelet meet a challange

The brand name Bioflow is facing a challange by the new Supreme magnetic bracelets bangles from Magnetic products Store. The range consists of four styles / colours, with two or more sizes per style. The colours available are Bronze, Silver, Gold & Silver and Antique Silver (Gothic). The unique point about those magnetic bracelets is that each pack a massive amount of magnetic field. Each bracelet have 6 magnets, for itself, not unusual arrangement. However, and this is a big houwever, two of those six magnets are super size super strong magnets, with pre-capped rating of 5,000 gauss each. The other four magnets have a pre-capped rating of 3,000 gauss each. Amazing.

The four styles are named on great rivers, The Nile, the Tigris, the Amazon and the Parana. The price is just £24.99, and one of them is currently on offer, the Tigris magnetic bangle for just £19.99.

Thursday, 5 August 2010

Union Rep. agrees

We just had a communication from the shop stuard at MPS, where he agrees that the Mars Titanium Magnetic Bracelet is a great product:

http://m1p1s.wordpress.com/2010/08/05/union-official-at-magnetic-products-store-endorsed-the-mars-titanium-magnetic-bracelet-for-men/

Weekend Best Seller

The best seller for the weekend that just past is the MARS Titanium magnetic Bracelets.

We did anticipate this line to be a good seller and we did have a large inventory in the warehouse. So what is the reason this line became a best seller?

At £39.99 it is not the cheapest bracelets out there. In fact, it is the most expensive bracelet we do. Still, compare to other similar magnetic bracelets out there, it is still a bargain. With two rows of magnets and stylish finish to the magnets' interior facing, this bracelet is an exceptional great value.

Thanks for all our customers that made this item so successful.

Saturday, 31 July 2010

Reviewd by buyer: NASAN II Premium Stainless Steel Magnetic Bracelet for Men

This magnetic bracelet is part of the new preium range of bracelets that just arrived. This range have nearly 20 different styles aim for both men and women. The big glick is the design of the magnets - black covering instead of capping, and two magnets in each links instead of one as normal.

The latest feedback came from a buyer who "...wear it for a bad leg and it really does work"

Tuesday, 27 July 2010

New direction

We are takinga new direction  - we will be zeroing down on products that are on sale at our on-line store.

Wednesday, 21 July 2010

According to legend, a shepherd little boy named Mantagues did discover a mineral that attracted the nails of his sandals, or his nails in his cane in some versions) as he crossed the mountains some twenty-five hundred years ago. Today it is known as magnetite.

Other great and varied sources claimed that the word "magnetism" comes from Magnesia, a city in ancient Greace where the stone could be found. At some point it was observed that when a magnet is left free to spin, it always comes to rest pointing North in the same position. We don't know exactly when this discovery was made, except for the fact that in 1975 Pierre de Maricourt differentiated the two poles.

During the fifteenth and a half century this unique characteristic of magnets was being used in navigation by the Arabs, the Vikings, and the Europeans.

The use of some form of magnetic compass was also commonly in use by the Chinese as early as around 109 AD. Magnetic therapy as such was not in wide use at the time, including the use of magnetic bracelets in magnetic jewellery. However, detailed experiments and possible observations about the properties of magnetism were not documented until much later. Magnets are mentioned in several documents written before the thirteenth century, but the "broken magnet" experiment, which demonstrates that a magnet is actually composed of many smaller magnets, was not known until A.D. 1299. At that time, European did not always pointed exactly to the geographic North.

Although the exact nature of magnetism was not yet known, around 1590 the Flemish cartographer G. Mercator, who created the first map of this and other worlds, succeeded in solving, more or less, the problem of a map where the geographic north indicated by the magnetic needle. And in 1590, William Gilbert, the official court physician of Queen Elizabeth, published his famous work De Magnete, which actually and in real terminology and great effect summarises all that was known and believed about magnetism in the Elizabethan age and attests to the use of magnets in magnetic therapy, many sometimes in fact with primitive and old magnetic bracelets and the treatment of illness.